Better Know a Classic: Americano


Americano

1 1/2 oz Campari
1 1/2 oz Sweet Vermouth <ideally an Italian one like Martini and Rossi, but any vermouth will do>

Combine Campari and Sweet Vermouth in a rocks or highball glass with ice, top with club soda and give a quick stir.  Garnish with orange wedge or peel


This post is the first (kind of*) in a series on classic drinks.  I’m using the term “classic” loosely here, as a way to refer to standard drinks that everyone should know.  They don’t necessarily have to be old to be considered classic, but they do have to be delicious.

* Of course I just thought of this series title, but some of my previous posts certainly meet the criteria 
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The Tone of a Drink


Brown Sound

1 1/2 oz Rye Whiskey <Rittenhouse>
3/4 oz Benedictine
3/4 oz Punt e Mes

Stir with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a cherry.


 

I remember when I first got into cocktails, I’d see Benedictine in various drinks around the city.  For a while, I wasn’t entirely clear on exactly what it was, but I knew I liked it.  Smart money said if it was on the menu, I was getting that drink.  Research didn’t provide any hints as to why I was so drawn to it, as the recipe is a closely guarded secret purportedly only known by three people at any given time.  Nevertheless, the brown base and heady mix of plants and spices enamored me so that it wasn’t long before I came home with a bottle of my own.  It’s been a home bar staple ever since.

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Mr. Tomato Head


Bloody Muddle

Tomato Juice
Lemon Juice (and zest if you want)
Salt
Black Pepper
Worcestershire Sauce
Horseradish
Smoked Paprika
Hot Sauce
Fish Sauce
Celery Bitters
etc…
2-3 oz (give or take) Chesuncook Botanical Spirit

Combine ingredients in a pitcher, adjusting flavors as necessary. Add liquor to pint glass filled with ice, top with Bloody Muddle. Garnish with celery stalk and pickle spear or whatever.  Top with a few dashes of celery bitters. If you don’t have Chesuncook, use vodka, gin, tequila, mezcal… you get the idea


I’ve had somewhat of a love/hate relationship with tomatoes.  Growing up, I would only eat them in sauce form, whether it be pizza or pasta.  The thought of a slice of tomato on a burger or sandwich made me shudder.  Luckily, a trip to Italy in college finally opened my eyes to their deliciousness.  After that, they slowly worked their way onto my subs and even into salads.  There was one hurdle I still couldn’t get over…the Bloody Mary.   Continue reading

Car Talk


Breaker Bar

1 oz Old Tom Gin <Hayman’s>
3/4 oz Amaro Montenegro
1/4 oz Campari
1 oz Port <Dow’s Finest Reserve>

Stir with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass.  Garnish with lemon twist.


On Tuesday night I came out to my car to find the front passenger side tire completely flat.  Closer inspection revealed a nail sticking out of the tread.  No biggie, I’ve changed plenty of tires in my day.  All I needed to do was grab the wheel lock key that lives under the passenger seat.  I looked in its usual spot only to find the thin pile of the floor mats.  Crap.  Lack of wheel lock keys makes changing the tire nigh impossible.  Even a call to AAA couldn’t get the tire off.  What should have been a simple twenty minute job now stretched into 2 hours and included me riding shotgun in the tow truck on the 40 minute ride home.  At least there was some unintentional comedy as the driver was rocking out to some Debbie Deb.   Continue reading

Accidentally On Purpose


Firepit

3/4 oz Mezcal <Sacrificio>
3/4 oz St. Germain
3/4 oz Grand Marnier
3/4 oz Lime Juice

Shake with ice, strain into an ice filled rocks glass. Garnish with flamed lime peel.


Recently we acquired a firepit for the backyard, and a few weekends ago we were able to light it up for the first time.  They are really wonderful things, making an evening simply sitting in the yard more than just sitting in the yard.  And of course you can’t sit around a fire with empty hands, so we sipped on some beers and cocktails as we stared into the flames.  Mrs. Muddle stayed true to form and had a La Palabra (and it was declicious, by the way).  After tasting hers I knew the fire experience would be enhanced my the smokiness of mezcal, and set off to make something with it for myself. Continue reading