Duty Free Drinks


Flying Finn

2 oz Gin <Napue>
3/4 oz Cloudberry Liqueur <Lignell & Piispanen>
1/4 oz Lemon Juice

Shake with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass.  Ideally you would garnish with a cloudberry, but a raspberry would work too.  Of course, when I made this, I had neither.


Scotland has Scotch, Mexico has Tequila and Mezcal, Japan has Sake.  Finland has…well, uh..vodka I guess.  There isn’t really a signature spirit as far as I can tell.  But they are all about their berries.  Raspberries, blueberries, lingonberries are everywhere.  There was even one berry I never heard of before…the cloudberry.  It kind of looks like s more bulbous orange raspberry.  We picked up a container on our first trip to Market Square in Helsinki during vacation.  The flavor is tart and a little sweet and kind of musty (in a good way) all at once.  As I read about the various ways they’re used (in pastries, as jam, mixed with cream and sugar), I discovered they are made into a liqueur that is popular in Finland. I guess the Finns do kind of have a signature booze after all. Continue reading

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A Scotsman Walks into a Tiki Bar…


Sticky Kilt

1 1/2 oz White Rum <Lawley’s Light New England Spirti>
1/2 oz Drambuie
1/2 oz Aperol
1/2 oz Lime Juice

Combine in a shaker and shake with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass


When I was younger we spent some holidays at my aunt and uncle’s house.  They lived in a split level, so the family room was on the lower level.  That’s where the tv was, so I spent plenty of hours down there.  Three things are imprinted on my brain from all that time.  1) My uncle had 6 or 7 cacti near the sliding glass door to the backyard.  One was the size of a basketball 2) The walls were this weird grayish textured wood paneling. 3) There was a trap door in a section of those panels that opened up and turned into a shelf suspended by chains.  Behind it was a compartment that contained a bunch of bottles, basically a semi-hidden bar (even though I didn’t see many drinks made there).  The only bottle I remember from their bar was Drambuie.  I have no idea why.

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Muddle Travels: Finland and Estonia


Everyman’s Right

1 healthy pour of chilled vodka <Saimaa>
1 spoonful of lingonbery and blueberry compote*
a squeeze of lemon juice

I’m using my vacation measurements for this one.  Combine everything in a rocks glass (or equivalent), and give a quick stir.  Garnish with fresh lingonberries and blueberries.

* If you don’t homemade compote on hand, muddled fresh berries or a spoonful of your favorite jam and some simple syrup should suffice.


Hey there!  Mrs. Muddle and I are back from our trip to Finland and Estonia, and we are pleased to report that both those countries have pretty formidable cocktail (and beer) scenes.  If there is one takeaway from drinking in that part of the world, it’s that fresh local ingredients in various forms are all the rage.  And I’m not just talking juices ; there were purees, foams, syrups, and of course garnishes.  Also berries.  Man do they love their berries. Continue reading

Mixology Monday CX – Vinegar

After participating in a few Mixology Mondays, I decided it’s time for me to step up and take on the hosting duties myself.  It is both an honor and a privelege.  For those unfamiliar with the concept, here’s the tl;dr version of Mixology Monday: Somebody picks a theme, then within two weeks, like-minded cocktail folk from across the interwebs submit their recipes using said theme.  You can check out the site to learn more. Continue reading

Trying to be Affable


 

Medium Talk

2 oz Gin <Citadelle>
3/4 oz Blanc Vermouth <Dolin>
1/2 oz Cocchi Americano

Express oils from lemon peel into a chilled coupe.  Stir ingredients in chilled mixing glass and strain into a coupe. Garnish with lemon peel and olives on the side.


I had the traditional James Bond split-base cocktail the Vesper, a cousin of the Martini, a couple months ago out at a Happy Hour in NYC.  After one of those potent drinks I was chatty, and after two, I was downright affable.  When I set out to make it at home, I substituted Cocchi Americano for Lillet – which elevated this classic drink – giving it a bolder, zippier finish. Cocchi is most similar to Kina Lillet, which the Vesper originally called for.

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