Green is for the Money


Last Word

3/4 oz Gin <Boodles>
3/4 oz Green Chartreuse
3/4 oz Maraschino Liqueur <Luxardo>
3/4 oz Lime Juice

Shake with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass.  Garnish with a cherry.


It’s almost April, which can only mean one thing…Masters Week!  I have the privilege of attending Wednesday’s practice round this year, and could not be more excited.  As such, I’ll be taking next week off*, but I knew whatever drink I wrote about today would be required to have Green Chartreuse in it, natch**.  What better cocktail to choose than the one that introduced me to this herbaceous, floral liqueur…the Last Word.

Continue reading

Aged from the Inside Out


Bling Bling

2 oz Pisco <Macchu Pisco>
1/2 oz Dry Vermouth <Dolin>
1/2 oz Green Chartreuse

Combine ingredients and stir with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass. To oak age, make a ten serving batch in a container with a tight fitting lid. Add about an ounce of oak cubes (or a spiral). Shake every day or so and taste every few days until desired flavors are reached. Strain into clean container.


 

In the last few years, barrel aged cocktails have definitely become a thing.  Bars are taking classic cocktails (or even their own creations), throwing them in an oak barrel, and waiting to see what happens.  For brown spirits in particular, kind of takes the whole booze thing full circle.  Bars have the buying power and space to procure and store 3-5 gallon barrels without much hassle.  So what is the home bartender to do?  Fear not, for I have the answer for you.  Even better, you can play along at home. Continue reading

Straddling the Line


Flying Pig

3/4 oz Genever <Bols>
3/4 oz Becherovka
3/4 oz Aperol
1/2 oz Blood Orange juice
1/4 oz Bourbon <Woodford Reserve>

Shake with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass


Genever is an interesting beast. It lives somewhere between gin and whiskey.  Gin is simply a distilled neutral grain spirit infused with some botanicals; genever is partly that same spirit, but also blended with a maltier spirit made from the same grains to give it a sweeter edge.  Serious Eats goes into a bit more detail, but you get the idea.  Genever is also the proto-gin, as the Dutch were making the stuff and throwing some of the classic gin botanicals (juniper, coriander, etc) into it to take the edge off.  Eventually it made its way to England and the malty base was eliminated, and you get the more familiar London Dry Gin.

Continue reading

Life is like a Bottle of Chocolate


Marge’s Bowling Ball

1 1/2 oz Bourbon
3/4 oz Green Chartreuse
1/2 oz dark Creme de Cacao
1/4 oz Cointreau
Few dashes Fee Bros Chocolate bitters

Stir with ice, strain into empty rocks glass


After a year or two of building our home bar, we had a wide variety of bottles to choose from.  We were able to make a nice range of interesting cocktails on any given night.  However, every now and then Mrs. Muddle would drop subtle hints that we should add some chocolate liqueur or creme de cacao to the mix.  Not surprising, since she has the bigger sweet tooth in the house.  After a few trips to the liquor store which resulted in nary a chocolate liqueur, the requests came more frequently.  Conveniently by this point, Valentine’s Day was right around the corner.

Continue reading