The Tone of a Drink


Brown Sound

1 1/2 oz Rye Whiskey <Rittenhouse>
3/4 oz Benedictine
3/4 oz Punt e Mes

Stir with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a cherry.


 

I remember when I first got into cocktails, I’d see Benedictine in various drinks around the city.  For a while, I wasn’t entirely clear on exactly what it was, but I knew I liked it.  Smart money said if it was on the menu, I was getting that drink.  Research didn’t provide any hints as to why I was so drawn to it, as the recipe is a closely guarded secret purportedly only known by three people at any given time.  Nevertheless, the brown base and heady mix of plants and spices enamored me so that it wasn’t long before I came home with a bottle of my own.  It’s been a home bar staple ever since.

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Rock and Roll Libation


The Thamesmen

2 oz Genever <Bols>
1/2 oz Grand Marnier
1/2 oz Punt e Mes
Few dashes Fee Bros Whiskey Barrel Aged Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into a chilled cocktial glass. Garnish with orange twist.


This passed weekend I stumbled upon Spinal Tap on TV.  I came in on the scene of them going over reviews of their earlier albums, which is pretty close to the beginning.  Next thing I know, they’re going on their reunion tour in Japan and the movie is over.  It was even on a channel with commercials, which is a testament to how much of a classic it really is. Continue reading

The Ol’ Switcheroo


Half-Windsor Knot

1 oz Cognac
1 oz Rye Whiskey <Old Overholt>
1/2 oz Dry Vermouth <Dolin>
1/2 oz Zucca
1 barspoon Benedictine

Stir with ice, strain over ice into a rocks glass (preferably one large cube)


Sometimes new drinks are just an ingredient swap away.  Often this will come out of necessity – I’ll read about a drink that sounds tasty, but will be missing one component.  Instead of abandoning it and looking for something else, a quick scan of the bar usually results in finding a suitable replacement.  Other times I’ll be in the mood for a particular bottle, come across a recipe with a bunch of other good stuff in it, and figure that bottle would fit in nicely.

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Mezcal: Tequila’s Mysterious Cousin


Curtain of Distraction

1 1/4 oz Mezcal <Sacrificio>
1 oz Drambuie
1/2 oz Coffee Liqueur <Galliano Ristretto>
1/2 oz lemon juice

Shake with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass.  Garnish with a lemon twist.


There are a few guarantees in life: seasons change, you pay your taxes, and if there is a mezcal drink on the menu, Mrs. Muddle will order it.  Ever since she discovered the”other” agave based spirit, she can not resist its powers.

Tequila and mezcal are distilled from the agave plant, but they have very different flavor profiles.  Tequila tends to be more vegetal and bright, while mezcal has a strong smokiness supported by earthy flavors.  Fans of Islay single malts and rich, woody bourbons will have no trouble making friends with this spirit.
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